Max Keiser: Negative Rates Are Coming


Max and Stacy discuss the first warning signs of negative rates coming for the US. Likely to come when the next financial crisis hits, the Fed has already paused hiking rates.

Keiser sounds off on a recent tweet from the ECB, depicting its President, Mario Draghi on the outcome of negative interest rates.

Keiser’s response is a fitting one,

“Since the era of Reagan, the financialization of the economy has become the dominant theme in global economics; So, we’re post-manufacturing, we entering into just a bank Ponzi scheme economy globally, that requires continuous money printing, as any Ponzi scheme does. So, this idea of negative interest rates is, the admission that simply printing money is not enough to keep the Ponzi scheme going. They have to confiscate money. They have to confiscate money from people’s accounts. The negative interest rates is coming to your banking account soon.”

Stacey continues to believe ordinary citizens should buy bitcoin, gold, and silver.

The two hosts look at European banks and why they are buying EU bonds again.

“The central bank is borrowing money from each other, to buy their own debt. They say they’re lending money to business to create economic activity to stimulate aggregate demand, but that’s false.”

The independence of various central banks is questioned.

Basel Agreement Begins on March 29th

The updated Bank for International Settlements’ known as “Basel 3” and its rules will update on March 29th. Under these rules, central banks can count their gold holdings, marked to market, as equivalent to cash. Gold is now a tier 1 asset.

Keiser states,

“Gold is now a reserve currency for the first time in decades. That is why China, Russia and these other countries have been aggressively buying gold.”

And that,

“Now, we’re back on a gold standard.”

Finally,

“The gold standard effectively, as of the end of this month, is back.”

In the second half, Max continues his interview with Mish Shedlock of MishTalk.com about the latest economic data out of America and whether or not the lofty stock market valuations are warranted.